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If you are passionate about hydrology and its role in achieving sustainable development goals then you can add your own post to the Hydrology Newsletter Blog

Your post will be peer-reviewed and if approved displayed in our blog.

Presently we are looking for articles/videos/infographics mainly on the following topics :

1) Rain Water Harvesting

2)Minimization of climatic impact on water and water-based energy systems

3)Impact of Climate Change on Virtual and Green Water Availability in Arid Regions

4)Flood Forecasting Models considering BIRR and Wildfire Impacts

5)Reservoir Optimization

6) Applications of IoT, Early Warning Systems, etc. in Water resource management 

You may also add your post related to :

Hydrology, Climate Change, Informatics, Data Science in Climate Change, Impact Analysis, Risk Analysis, AI in Climate Change Analysis, and Predictive Modeling.

Type of Posts we are accepting :

Original Research:

This is the most common type of journal manuscript used to publish full reports of data from research. It may be called an Original Article, Research Article, Research, or just an Article, depending on the journal. The Original Research format is suitable for many different fields and different types of studies. It includes full Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections.

Short reports or Letters:

These papers communicate brief reports of data from original research that editors believe will be interesting to many researchers, and that will likely stimulate further research in the field. As they are relatively short the format is useful for scientists with results that are time-sensitive (for example, those in highly competitive or quickly-changing disciplines). This format often has strict length limits, so some experimental details may not be published until the authors write a full Original Research manuscript. These papers are also sometimes called Brief communications.

Review Articles:

Review Articles provide a comprehensive summary of research on a certain topic, and a perspective on the state of the field and where it is heading. They are often written by leaders in a particular discipline after an invitation from the editors of a journal. Reviews are often widely read (for example, by researchers looking for a full introduction to a field) and highly cited. Reviews commonly cite approximately 100 primary research articles.

Case Studies:

These articles report specific instances of interesting phenomena. A goal of Case Studies is to make other researchers aware of the possibility that a specific phenomenon might occur. This type of study is often used in medicine to report the occurrence of previously unknown or emerging pathologies.

Methodologies or Methods

These articles present a new experimental method, test, or procedure. The method described may either be completely new or may offer a better version of an existing method. The article should describe a demonstrable advance on what is currently available.

Infographics

An infographic is a collection of imagery, data visualizations like pie charts and bar graphs, and minimal text that gives an easy-to-understand overview of a topic.

Videos 

Casestudy/Tutorial Videos are welcome. The videos must be self-made.

Benefits of Publishing in Hydrology Newsletters

When you publish your article/videos on our blog you have the opportunity to showcase your creativity to the world of like-minded readers. Not only this will enable you to promote your content to an audience who is already interested in your text, but you will also get a scope to publish in our :

a)Monthly Newsletters:

b) Journals that are published by EIS Publishers,

c) Books that we will publish from EIS or other reputed publishers.

So to become a part of the Hydrology Newsletter kindly email your content to 

editor.at.baipatra.ws or contact.at.energyinstyle.website or click here for online submission.

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